Rare 1960’s Photos of the Beatles and Rolling Stones Found

October 2nd, 2015

This is an article from the all-new NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 issue of Guitar Aficionado magazine. For this story, plus features on Ron Wood’s recently published diary about his time in Swinging London’s 1965 music scene, former Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour’s new album, country rebel Dwight Yoakam, electric blues guitarist Joe Bonamassa’s vintage guitar collection, and more, pick up the new issue of Guitar Aficionado at your newsstand, or online by clicking anywhere in this text.

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RARE 1960’s PHOTOS OF THE BEATLES AND ROLLING STONES FOUND
Limited-Edition Fine Art Prints of Rare, Previously Unseen Images are Available Now

(Top: On a day before the Beatles’ first Hollywood Bowl concert on August 23, 1964, the band relaxes by the pool of British actor Reginald Owen’s Bel Air mansion, which he rented to them after the Ambassador Hotel cancelled their reservation out of fear of Beatlemania pandemonium.)

To view more from the archive and purchase images from the Bob Bonis collection, click here.

The British Invasion was by far the most important event in music history of our lifetime, establishing rock and roll and the guitar as dominant elements of American culture that still thrive today. The most influential acts of this movement were the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, and images of these artists from their appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show and at news conferences have become iconic reference points.

However, no one had a more complete perspective on the British Invasion than Bob Bonis, who crossed the entire United States with the Beatles and the Rolling Stones as the tour manager for both bands between 1964 and 1966. Bonis had unlimited access to both bands, and he traveled beyond the stage and to studios, hotels, and their leisure activities as well. Fortunately, Bonis had the incredible foresight to capture these events with his Leica M3 rangefinder camera.

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(Above: Keith Richards and Mick Jagger captured from a rare back-of-the-stage perspective at Ernst-Merck-Halle, Hamburg, West Germany, September 13, 1965.)

In addition to several historic concerts, Bonis photographed many shows off the beaten path where he was the only person who documented the event. Equally impressive are Bonis’s photos of the band members when they were out of the spotlight. These were candid, intimate moments that few witnessed and which reveal a different, more human and relatable side of these legendary musicians during their rise to fame. Moments include Mick Jagger in his hotel room quietly watching his band perform on television, George Harrison tuning up backstage between shows, the Beatles joking around at a private home in Bel Air, and much more.

While Bonis shot more than 3,500 images of both bands, he only allowed a handful of his shots to be published in teen magazines during the mid Sixties before stashing away his collection from public view. It wasn’t until many years after his death in 1992 that his son Alex decided that the time was right to share these historic images with fans and the public in honor of his father’s legacy. The Bob Bonis Archive is offering limited-edition fine art prints of his rare, previously unseen images for prices ranging from $175 to $625. The archive is certified by The GRAMMY Museum, and each print comes with a certificate of authenticity from them verifying the limited editions and that the prints are derived from the original negatives.

To view more from the archive and purchase images from the Bob Bonis collection, click here.

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This is an article from the all-new NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 issue of Guitar Aficionado magazine. For this story, plus features on Ron Wood’s recently published diary about his time in Swinging London’s 1965 music scene, former Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour’s new album, country rebel Dwight Yoakam, electric blues guitarist Joe Bonamassa’s vintage guitar collection, and more, pick up the new issue of Guitar Aficionado at your newsstand, or online by clicking anywhere in this text.

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